Kukuli Velarde

Kukuli Velarde is a Peruvian artist based in the United States since 1987. She earned her BFA degree (Magna Cum Laude) at Hunter College of the City University of New York. Her exhibition credits include: KUKULI VELARDE at AMOCA, 2017; CORPUS video, Mercosul Biennial Porto Alegre, Brazil 2015; PLUNDER ME, BABY at the Yingge Museum of Ceramics’ Biennial of Taipei, Taiwan 2014; CORPUS (work in Progress) at the Gyeonggi International Ceramic Biennial in South Korea 2013 (Grand Prize winner); KUKULI VELARDE: PLUNDER ME, BABY at the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art in (Kansas city, KS in 2013); PATRIMONIO at German Krüeger Espantoso Gallery-ICPNA (Lima, Perú, 2012); PATRIMONIO at Barry Friedman Gallery (NY, 2010); and PLUNDER ME, BABY at Garth Clark Gallery (NY, 2007). She has received awards and grants such as the Guggenheim Fellowship (New York- 2015), the Franz and Virginia Bader Foundation Grant (Washington DC. 2014), the Pollock Krasner Foundation grant (New York- 2012), the Leeway Foundation Transformation award (Pennsylvania- 2011), the United States Artists-Knight fellowship (California- 2009), the Pew fellowship in Visual Arts (Pennsylvania- 2003), the Anonymous is a Woman award (New York- 2000), the Joan Mitchell Foundation grant (New York- 1997), among others. In 1993 she got a recognition for Fighting for Freedom of Expression from Andy Warhol Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, Merce Cunningham Foundation at MOMA. New York, NY. She is married to Doug Herren, sculptor and they have a small daughter named Vida. They live in Philadelphia, PA. USA.
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Title: Bites Will Not Trust Like Tough Love
Artist: Kukuli Velarde
Peruvian Kukuli Velarde makes work indebted to folk tradition and traditional ornamentation, exploring the new politics of identity, estrangements of context and acts of “forgetfulness” that occur as art is displaced from its origin. ‘Bites. Will Not Trust. Like Tough Love’ reveals itself as awakened in its situation, the mythic figure of half-bull, half-man caught uncertain, pulled from privacy, in its beautifully lifelike visage. The artist projects her own image onto the creature with the use of a head cast to reclaim the objects identity, and inherits and absorbs the (racially motivated) belittling title that reflects ongoing derogatory behaviour towards Latin America and its women.
Title: Culebreando
Artist: Kukuli Velarde
Part of the The Isichapuitu Series. Peruvian Kukuli Velarde makes work indebted to folk tradition and traditional ornamentation, exploring the new politics of identity, estrangements of context and acts of “forgetfulness” that occur as art is displaced from its origin. ‘Culebreando’ is cut from a series of works exploring memory, fear, desire and ideology through figurative icons that, in tandem, present a larger picture of the artists identity and belief in a shared system of traits. Choosing a simple white glaze, Velarde adds graffitied text and image across the figurative body that slide between allusions to harm or violence and emotional upheaval — words such as ‘miedo de caer pero’ (fear of falling’) or ‘corazón no suede’ (‘heart can not’) tattood across the chest, and the repeated symbol of the serpent is knowingly deployed in reference to feminine temptation and the suffering inflicted by that notion.
Title: Entangled
Artist: Kukuli Velarde
'ISICHAPUITU (MELANCHOLY, FLAKY, NETA, Peruvian Kukuli Velarde makes work indebted to folk tradition and traditional ornamentation, exploring the new politics of identity, estrangements of context and acts of “forgetfulness” that occur as art is displaced from its origin. ‘Entangled’ is cut from a series of works exploring memory, fear, desire and ideology through figurative icons that, in tandem, present a larger picture of the artists identity and belief in a shared system of traits. The snake rears in appearance over several of these figures in the “Isichapuitu” series as Velarde — albeit here a transformed, mythic vision of the serpent — and surrounds the figure in a suffocating, controlling mass. ENTANGLED, CULEBREANDO), 1998-2001 glazed earthenware each 24 in. (61 cm.) high (5) Sheboygan, Kohler Arts Center, Kukuli Velarde: Cantaros de Vida (The Isichapuitu Series), 2002.
Title: Isichapuitu
Artist: Kukuli Velarde
Peruvian Kukuli Velarde makes work indebted to folk tradition and traditional ornamentation, exploring the new politics of identity, estrangements of context and acts of “forgetfulness” that occur as art is displaced from its origin. ‘Isichapuiti’ is cut from a series of works exploring memory, fear, desire and ideology through figurative icons that, in tandem, present a larger picture of the artists identity and belief in a shared system of traits. This piece is particularly exposed, the filigree found etched into the ceramic of other figures in this series having been left out in favour of a simple, smooth dark skin. The strange reduction and decentralisation of the female form is only recognisable by its sexual interface and coded use of flowers, the otherwise raw clay punctured with fresh stigmata pick out in a vivid, glossy red that speaks of silent pain & suffering.
Title: Jodida Indeja
Artist: Kukuli Velarde
Provenance: Barry Friedman LTD, New York, New York
Title: La Neta
Artist: Kukuli Velarde
Peruvian Kukuli Velarde makes work indebted to folk tradition and traditional ornamentation, exploring the new politics of identity, estrangements of context and acts of “forgetfulness” that occur as art is displaced from its origin. ‘LA Neta’ is cut from a series of works exploring memory, fear, desire and ideology through figurative icons that, in tandem, present a larger picture of the artists identity and belief in a shared system of traits. The sculpture seems dreamlike and more hopeful than many within the ‘Isichapuitu’ set, the ceramic finished in a deep blue glaze and gold enamel that reflects an attractive lustre. Flames or leaves erupt along the surface in a suggestion of sexual vitality or growth, whilst lucid verse traces ribbon-like from the figures mouth and down across its circumference — and speaks of time, origins and discovery. 'ISICHAPUITU series, 1998-2001 glazed earthenware 24 in. (61 cm.) high (5) Sheboygan, Kohler Arts Center, Kukuli Velarde: Cantaros de Vida (The Isichapuitu Series), 2002.
Title: Melancholy, Rancor and Bitterness
Artist: Kukuli Velarde
'ISICHAPUITU (MELANCHOLY, FLAKY, NETA, Peruvian Kukuli Velarde makes work indebted to folk tradition and traditional ornamentation, exploring the new politics of identity, estrangements of context and acts of “forgetfulness” that occur as art is displaced from its origin. ‘Melancholy’ is cut from a series of works exploring memory, fear, desire and ideology through figurative icons that, in tandem, present a larger picture of the artists identity and belief in a shared system of traits. The sculpture is arguably the most elaborate and outwardly ornate of the series, the surface of the ceramic fired and highlighted to bring out a subtle pink hue that intensifies around points of depth or detail in a remarkably flesh-like manner. Cracked fins or extraneous, flaking details (most noticeably in the halo surrounding the head of the figure) are given a rich golden enamel coat, their reptilian nature reinforced by the brace of lizards crawling across and penetrating the surface of the form in an abject and violently sexual fusion. ENTANGLED, CULEBREANDO), 1998-2001 glazed earthenware each 24 in. (61 cm.) high (5) Sheboygan, Kohler Arts Center, Kukuli Velarde: Cantaros de Vida (The Isichapuitu Series), 2002.
Title: Sometimes I Am Kind Of Flaky
Artist: Kukuli Velarde
Peruvian Kukuli Velarde makes work indebted to folk tradition and traditional ornamentation, exploring the new politics of identity, estrangements of context and acts of “forgetfulness” that occur as art is displaced from its origin. ‘Sometimes I Am Kind of Flaky’ is cut from a series of works exploring memory, fear, desire and ideology through figurative icons that, in tandem, present a larger picture of the artists identity and belief in a shared system of traits. The integrity of this particular form appears to be breaking down, its surface indicative of a rough degradation of clay and flaked paint as to an artefact or ancient form unearthed — whilst the palette choice and suggestion of friction radiate a uneasy trauma and sense of inflicted damage. 'ISICHAPUITU series, 1998-2001 glazed earthenware 24 in. (61 cm.) high (5) Sheboygan, Kohler Arts Center, Kukuli Velarde: Cantaros de Vida (The Isichapuitu Series), 2002.